LATEST NEWS HEADLINES

Miscarriage of justice cases


Names are in alphabetic order by surname; click on the letters below to jump straight to that letter. You can also use CTRL+F (CMD+F on a Mac) and type the name you want to search for.

Please note that this page is permanently under construction: new cases are being added every week! If you click on a name and get a 404 page not found error, please check back later as it means that the case file page is in the process of being prepared and uploaded.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

Click here

Name Case history Posts
A Top
Adams, Andrew After 14 years in prison, a CCRC investigation showed that the prosecution’s only witness – who provided the only ‘evidence’ against Andrew Adams – had perjured himself and the police withheld evidence and documents from the defence for over a decade. But the Justice Secretary refused compensation and the Supreme Court ruled that no miscarriage of justice had taken place. Click here
Ahmed, Ishtiaq Ishtiaq Ahmed was convicted of the 1989 murder of David Pickering in what became known locally as ‘the bedsit murder’. There were no eyewitnesses to the crime, and the only witness who could place Ahmed at the scene gave five separate witness statements and didn’t incriminate Ahmed until the last one. The Crown Prosecution Service suppressed a report about the behaviour of Thames Valley Police officers on the case before it could be released. Click here
Ahmed, Waqar After three trials, the three men accused of murdering a young IT worker during the Birmingham riots were finally cleared. A judge ruled that a secret recording of one of the men encouraging another man to confess was not disclosed to the defence, rendering the original convictions unsafe. Click here
Alami, Samar “Months before the bombing of the Israeli embassy in London in 1994 MI5 received intelligence of a terrorist organisation asking about the building’s “location and defences”, it was revealed in the appeal court yesterday. According to a hitherto undisclosed MI5 report, the organisation was not connected to Jawad Botmeh and Samar Alami, two Palestinian students convicted for conspiracy to cause explosions in 1996 and jailed for 20 years.” Click here
Allder, Andrew 17 year old Andrew went to Aylesbury Police Station because he matched the description of a suspect wanted in the stabbing of 67 year old sales assistant Kathleen Turner. Despite his father, brother, social worker, members of the public and DHSS staff all confirming that he was signing on at the time of the murder, and with no physical evidence, he was charged, convicted and spent 17 years in prison. Click here
Alexander, Mark When retired English teacher Samuel Alexander disappeared in 2009, the alarm was soon raised. His body was later discovered buried at his family home. His son, Mark Alexander – a 22 year old law student and entrepreneur – was wrongly accused of the murder and is now serving 16 years mandatory life imprisonment. He has always maintained his unqualified innocence. (external link) Click here
Allan, Alex Alex Allan, who spent six years behind bars for a robbery he did not commit, had his conviction quashed after a group of law students took his case to the Court of Appeal. Eight undergraduates at the University of Northumbria investigated Allan’s claim that he had been wrongly convicted as part of their studies. They cleared his name after three judges ruled that Mr Allan had indeed been the victim of a miscarriage of justice. Click here
Allison, Billy Billy Allison and Steven Johnston were jailed for a 1995 murder, despite the dead man being seen and spoken to a number of times before he was eventually found dead. An investigation led to the convictions being overturned and the detective inspector on the case jailed for perverting the course of justice. Click here
Altaaf, Eman The victim, Ishrat Khan, said he was attacked in a Nottingham street by three men wearing balaclavas. Khan, who was very drunk at the time of the attack, identified Altaaf, Hussain and Ali as his attackers. Independent witnesses said only one of the men wore a balaclava. One witness said that two of the attackers were white. All the men convicted are Asian. All had strong alibis. Click here
Anthony, Donna Donna Anthony was just one of 28 convictions referred to the CCRC after being convicted of murdering her children on the basis of evidence given by the disgraced Roy Meadow. She served six years before being freed. Click here
Asbury, David In one of a number of similar cases, fingerprint evidence provided by the Scottish Criminal Records Office was shown in court to be unreliable. Because of that, David Asbury spent three and a half years prison for a murder and robbery he didn’t commit. Click here
Ashberry, David David Ashberry was convicted of the murder of a shopkeeper. The only evidence was a statement saying that the three accused had stayed in her flat near the off licence, from a witness who was allowed to lie, be sarcastic and storm out of the trial, and who admitted she only included one name in her statement on the suggestion of the police. Click here
Azam, Usman The victim, Ishrat Khan, said he was attacked in a Nottingham street by three men wearing balaclavas. Khan, who was very drunk at the time of the attack, identified Altaaf, Hussain and Ali as his attackers. Independent witnesses said only one of the men wore a balaclava. One witness said that two of the attackers were white. All the men convicted are Asian. All had strong alibis. Click here
B Top
Bass, Patricia Patricia Bass was twice tried and twice convicted of her own mother’s murder, even though another man – who was a suspect in the murder of another woman – had earlier confessed. Click here
Barstow, Clare Clare Barstow is currently serving a life sentence at Cookham Wood Prison in Kent for a crime she did not commit. In July 1992 she was convicted of the murder of Cathy O’Neil at the Old Bailey, despite there being no forensic evidence to link her to the crime. Click here
Beardmore, Roger Roger was convicted of rape and attempted rape by Stafford Crown Court in March 1998 by a girl who claimed Beardmore had raped her multiple times between the ages of three and six. Aged 14, she admitted that she had made up the whole tale to get more attention from her mother. Click here
Birmingham Six The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal on 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
Blackburn, Paul “Then there are the many holes in the case against him: that aged 14 he wasn’t allowed a solicitor; that it was unlikely such a vulnerable, troubled child could have written a confession with such a command of vocabulary as the statement displays; that the police apparently took more than 2000 statements, none of which incriminated Blackburn; that Blackburn was the wrong age, had different coloured hair and wore different clothes to those described by the victim.” Click here
Blackwell, Warren A report revealed yesterday that officers were told Taylor was ‘unreliable’, ‘ unstable’ and craved attention – but they failed to disclose it at his trial. His conviction was quashed in September 2006 when it became clear that not only did Mr Blackwell not commit the crime, it never took place. The IPCC probe found failings by three officers who had a case to answer on misconduct grounds. But the CPS proposed no criminal action should be taken, the IPCC said. One officer has retired and two others will now receive “management words of advice”. Click here
Booker, Shaun Shaun Booker was jailed in 2002 over the death of 57-year-old Michael Marples. But new information meant the conviction could not stand, London’s Criminal Appeal Court heard on Monday. However, the reason could not be given without causing “serious damage to the public interest”, judges said. “We acknowledge this must be less than satisfactory for Mr Booker, but it is a course we are bound to take in the public interest…” Click here
Botmeh, Jawad “Months before the bombing of the Israeli embassy in London in 1994 MI5 received intelligence of a terrorist organisation asking about the building’s “location and defences”, it was revealed in the appeal court yesterday. According to a hitherto undisclosed MI5 report, the organisation was not connected to Jawad Botmeh and Samar Alami, two Palestinian students convicted for conspiracy to cause explosions in 1996 and jailed for 20 years.” Click here
Bowman, Thomas Thomas Bowman discovered his wife dead one morning with her system full of alcohol and valium. 25 years later, a therapist uncovered ‘memories’ his daughter had repressed of being raped by her father, and him killing her mother. After exhuming the body, a pathologist decided that Bowman’s wife had been strangled – and then it was discovered there were parts from more than one body in her grave. Click here
Brannan, John Nine witness said that Michael Pollitt was threatening Brannan and Murphy with a knfe, and the Police knew it too. When that knowledge became public their conviction was overturned, but by then it was too late for Bernard Murphy. Click here
Brooke, Ian 2,226 people questioned, 42 arrested and 3 convicted, on the basis of one witness’ testimony; a witness of whom staff at the care home said “she thrives on exaggerating events to their most theatrical extremes. She employs shock tactics in an attempt to convince adults that her problems are more serious than anyone else’s.” Click here
Bunting, Michael Michael Bunting was a commended officer with West Yorkshire Police who served bravely during the Bradford riots, until the Professional Standards Department opened an investigation into his conduct during an arrest. Click here
C Top
Callaghan, Hugh The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal on 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
Callan, Kevin John Kevin Callan became nationally famous when his conviction for murder was overturned on 6 April 1995. A former truck driver who had left school without qualifications, he had been convicted of shaking to death Amanda Allman, a helpless four-year-old child who suffered from cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia. Click here
Campbell, Trevor “So far as Campbell is concerned, it is not open to you to return a verdict of manslaughter. The case against him is that the statement that he made was a confession to murder, and either he made it voluntarily and it is true, or it was beaten out of him… I am sorry, not ‘beaten’, but it is a manufacture of the police officers, a complete manufacture which he signed because he was being beaten up. It is as simple as that.” Enter West Midlands Serious Crime Squad. Click here
Cannings, Angela Angela Cannings’ conviction (for which she received life imprisonment) was based on claims that she had smothered the children, but was overturned as unsafe by the Court of Appeal on 10 December 2003. Cannings was convicted after the involvement in her case of Professor Sir Roy Meadow, a controversial paediatrician who was later struck off, then reinstated, by the General Medical Council. Click here
Christie, Antonio A star police witness who should have been charged under joint enterprise involved in an intimate affair with an officer attached to the case, a hopelessly bungled police investigation into a murder and a failure to discipline several senior police officers make the murder of Kevin Nunes look like a story that will run for a long time yet. Click here
Cole, Joanne In a five-day trial at the Old Bailey in January 2001, she pleaded not guilty on grounds of self-defence. The jury did not accept her account, and she was jailed for life with a recommendation that she serve at least nine years. According to Cole, she “didn’t tell the police the full extent of Patrick’s violence towards me”. Her lawyer, Harriet Wistrich, of Birnberg Pearce, believes that had the jury known of the extent of psychological damage inflicted by years of abuse, a defence of provocation could have succeeded. Click here
Collett, Mark Mark Collett was convicted under joint enterprise of the murder of Jon Hancock. The only evidence was a phone bill, showing that he had spoken to the actual killers. Click here
Crooks, Owen Michael A star police witness who should have been charged under joint enterprise involved in an intimate affair with an officer attached to the case, a hopelessly bungled police investigation into a murder and a failure to discipline several senior police officers make the murder of Kevin Nunes look like a story that will run for a long time yet. Click here
D Top
Dallagher, Mark Mark Dallagher was convicted on the strength of junk science regarding earprint testimony from a foreign police officer with no formal forensic science training. Dallagher was freed when West Yorkshire Police commissioned new DNA testing. Click here
Dixon, Brendan Patrick Docherty, 49, and Brendan Dixon, 45, were sentenced to at least 25 years for killing Margaret Irvine in Galston, Ayrshire, in 2003. Docherty’s legal team claimed the Crown did not disclose evidence, he was interviewed without a lawyer and the judge did not properly direct the jury. Click here
Docherty, Patrick Patrick Docherty, 49, and Brendan Dixon, 45, were sentenced to at least 25 years for killing Margaret Irvine in Galston, Ayrshire, in 2003. Docherty’s legal team claimed the Crown did not disclose evidence, he was interviewed without a lawyer and the judge did not properly direct the jury. Click here
E Top
English, Philip Philip English, aged 15, was convicted of the murder of a police officer even though at the time he was stabbed, English was out of sight of the incident and being restrained by another police officer. Click here
Evans, Andrew Former soldier Andrew Evans, suffering from anxiety and depression, thought that he’d dreamed about the face of a young murder victim and asked police to see a picture of her. That was enough to convict him of her murder, and it took him 25 years to get out of prison and clear his name. Click here
F Top
Fraser, Lloyd Lloyd Fraser was convicted of the possession of cannabis with intent to supply after West Midlands Serious Crime Squad planted drugs in his car. He spent seven years in jail until his conviction was quashed when a judge ruled that one of the detectives ‘could not be seen as a witness of truth’. Click here
G Top
Gage, William William Gage’s appeal against the conviction of murder has been denied. This judgment is a travesty of justice, which relies wholly on circumstantial evidence, it is inconceivable that the evidence, the burden of proof, led at the trial can prove beyond a reasonable that William Gage has any involvement with the shooting of Justin McIlroy. Click here
Gay, Angela and Ian Angela and Ian Gay spent 15 months in prison after being convicted of the murder of their adoptive son Christian – supposedly by force-feeding him salt as a punishment for misbehaviour. Click here
Geen, Ben Branded a ‘killer nurse’ by the media, experts have argued that the deaths wer down to natural causes and are nothing more than the normal statistical spread. Click here
Gill, Tarlochan Singh Tarlochan Singh Gill spent ten years in prison, for the murder of an elderly woman during a burglary. He maintained that he’d been beaten into a confession by members of the West Midlands Serious Crime Squad until his conviction was overturned in 1994. Click here
Green, Thomas Convicted of a sectarian killing, Thomas Green spent 13 years in prison before new medical evidence proved that his “alleged confession was factually unreliable and totally worthless”. Click here
H Top
Hall, Alexander Alexander Hall spent 11 years in jail before it was discovered that a key prosecution witness had lied whilst giving evidence. Click here
Hemphill, John Of John Hemphill’s defence, the appeal judge said: “The failure of investigation and preparation of the defence case was so fundamental in the circumstances of this case that it affected the conduct of his defence to such an extent that he did not have the fair trial he to which he was entitled.” Click here
Hewins, Annette Annette Hewins was convicted of the murder by arson of a young mother and her two children. But the appeal judge said, “there was no sufficient evidence to prove the case against her”. Click here
Hill, Patrick Joseph The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal on 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
Holdsworth, Suzanne
Suzanne was convicted in 2005 at Teeside Crown Court of killing a two-year-old child, Kyle Fisher, by banging his head against a banister. A much respected person who was frequently called upon to look after children, Suzanne was convicted only because the death of Kyle was said by ‘experts’ to have been caused during the time when he was in her care. Friends, including members of Kyle’s own family, believe her conviction to have been a gross miscarriage of justice. At her appeal on 1 May 2008, Henry Blaxland QC (instructed by solicitor Campbell Malone) presented fresh medical evidence. Her conviction was overturned and a retrial ordered. The retrial ended on 18 December 2008 with Suzanne found not guilty.
Click here
Hunter, Gerard The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal on 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
Hussein, Aseet The victim, Ishrat Khan, said he was attacked in a Nottingham street by three men wearing balaclavas. Khan, who was very drunk at the time of the attack, identified Altaaf, Hussain and Ali as his attackers. Independent witnesses said only one of the men wore a balaclava. One witness said that two of the attackers were white. All the men convicted are Asian. All had strong alibis. Click here
Hyatt, Keith Keith Hyatt was accused of helping his friend Barri White murder White’s girlfriend. The team at the BBC’s Rough Justice programme weren’t so sure, and decided to do a little digging. What they found set him free. Click here
I Top
Ingram, Jimmy Jimmy Ingram was a small-time local thief who argued he was fitted up for murder by police when they intimidated the one witness who could exonerate him. Sadly, Jimmy died in prison in April 2010 without ever being able to prove his innocence (external link). Click here
Irvine, Patrick Irvine complained that officers from West Midlands Serious Crime Squad simply made up his confession. He was lucky; his co-accused ‘accomplice’ was tortured into a confession by police, who held a plastic bag held over his head. Click here
J Top
Jenkinson, Amanda Her conviction was overturned on 18 November 2005 by the Court of Appeal following a referral by the Criminal Cases review Commission. Judges heard that the evidence against her was ‘fundamentally flawed, inaccurate and misleading’. Click here
Johnston, Steven Billy Allison and Steven Johnston were jailed for a 1995 murder, despite the dead man being seen and spoken to a number of times before he was eventually found dead. An investigation led to the convictions being overturned and the detective inspector on the case jailed for perverting the course of justice. Click here
Joof, Adam A star police witness who should have been charged under joint enterprise involved in an intimate affair with an officer attached to the case, a hopelessly bungled police investigation into a murder and a failure to discipline several senior police officers make the murder of Kevin Nunes look like a story that will run for a long time yet. Click here
K Top
Karling, Richard  Richard Karling was accused of posioning his former girlfriend. Evidence showing that the drug he was supposed to have used wasn’t in her system was suppressed by the state. Click here
Kayretli, Serena  Even though Home Office pathologist Dr Paula Lanas had been under investigation by her colleague for many months, her testimony was still used to send Serena and her husband Veydat to prison for manslaughter. The couple were freed when Dr Lanas’ testimony was shown to be unreliable. Click here
Keaveney, Kate  Even though Home Office pathologist Dr Paula Lanas had been under investigation by her colleague for many months, her testimony was still used to send Serena and her husband Veydat to prison for manslaughter. The couple were freed when Dr Lanas’ testimony was shown to be unreliable. Click here
Kenealy, Billy Billy was very drunk and had been smoking heavily, but the women he was convicted of raping said that the rapist wasn’t drunk and didn’t smell of alcohol or tobacco. Police said he’d used a condom when he raped them, although the victims said the rapist definitely hadn’t. The judge wouldn’t allow 19 of Billy’s character witnesses to appear. The eldest daughter of one of the victims was having an affair with a police officer – and she was later found dead. Did she know something about the strange case of Billy Kenealy? Click here
Kincaid, Mark Mark Kincaid from Ballybeen, near Belfast, Northern Ireland, was convicted of the murder of hospital porter David Hamilton, 40, because his fingerprint was found on broken glass close to the victim’s body, in the victim’s flat. Mark, aged 26 at the time of his conviction on 30 November 2007, had been to a party in the flat some weeks previously, but said he had not returned since then, and, as the judge acknowledged, had no motive to murder. His co-defendants William Anderson, 25, and Gareth Anderson, 24,  also denied they took part in the attack or were even at Mr Hamilton’s flat. Click here
King, Ashley 14 years after being imprisoned for the ‘penny for the guy’ murder, Ashley King was freed in 1999. Three appeal judges quashed the conviction after hearing expert testimony stating that King had a low IQ, bordering on mental incapacity and displayed signs of being “excessively compliant and suggestible”. Click here
Khan, Azhil After three trials, the three men accused of murdering a young IT worker during the Birmingham riots were finally cleared. A judge ruled that a secret recording of one of the men encouraging another man to confess was not disclosed to the defence, rendering the original convictions unsafe. Click here
L Top
Lawson, Michael A police trawling exercise on a care home saw 91 staff under investigation as police desperately searched for crimes to fit their suspects. Michael Lawson – a former police officer – was charged with 17 counts of abuse as ‘victims’ switched their allegation from one member of staff to another when prosecutions failed simply to claim compensation. Click here
Lewis, George West Midlands Serious Crime Squad officers punched and head-butted George Lewis, threatened him with a syringe and forced him to sign blank forms so they could write his ‘confession’ later. Click here
Liehne, Jennifer Social workers pressed for a murder investigation after taking two children away from a mother whose baby died of pneumonia – 24 years earlier. Click here
Long, George Even the prison medical officer said that George Long was incapable of telling the different between fact and fiction, but the police still interviewed him without a solicitor and used that confession against him. Click here
M Top
Major, Danny A police officer jailed for assault after West Yorkshire Police colleagues testified against him. He was jailed for 15 months in 2006 when he was convicted, at a retrial, of assaulting a drunken teenager at Bridewell police station in Leeds on 6 September 2003. He has always protested his innocence, claiming that senior officers were reluctant to delve into his case because of fears of damaging the reputation of the force. He and his father, a retired policeman, have been campaigning since his conviction for it to be overturned. Click here
Mansell, Daniel West Yorkshire Police plied a supergrass with drugs, alcohol and sex as he provided testimony used to implicate Daniel Mansell in a murder. Click here
McCalla, Trevor West Midlands Serious Crime Squad knew they had an innocent man on their hands; so they made up new ‘facts’ to implicate him. Click here
McCreight, Craig A basic arithmetic error in calculations about the amount of chloroform in his partner’s system led to Craig McCreight going to prison for murder. Click here
McGrath, Christy The day before his trial for murder, Christy McGrath was persuaded by his own lawyer to change his plea to guilty of manslaughter. Christy had fought with the victim in self defence, and hit him with a brick. But after he received a life sentence, he learned that the victim died later from strangulation, something Christy could not have done. Click here
McIlkenny, Richard The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal oVChn 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
McLoughlin, John Even when the ‘victim’ admitted allegations of abuse against McLoughlin were fabricated, Humberside Police decided to proceed with the prosecution and McLoughlin spent years in jail as a result. Click here
McMenamin, Charlie Charlie McMenamin was questioned illegally, beaten during interrogation and convicted in a non-jury court. Crucial alibi evidence was suppressed and the 16-year-old was bullied into signing a false confession and pleading guilty. While in detention fear and despair drove the Derry teenager to attempt suicide. Click here
McNamara Alan  Why would a successful family man, whose business was making a six figure profit, be interested in petty theft? Or could it be that the fingerprint experts were making a mistake? Click here
McPhee, George Police ignored their own expert’s testimony, and it took George McPhee 18 years to convince the authorities that he was innocent and the police were wrong. Click here
Mills, Billy At the Court of Appeal in Edinburgh, judges acknowledged that new DNA evidence had emerged.  The Lord Justice Clerk, Lord Gill, said: “The new evidence confirms all of our reservations about this conviction. We agree that there is clearly reasonable doubt. We conclude that there has been a miscarriage of justice and allow the appeal.” Click here
Mirza, Waseem The University of Gloucester Innocence Project has taken up the case of Waseem Mirza, a left-handed man with an injured right hand who was convicted or murder a young mother who was killed by a right-handed assailant. Click here
Mockble, Lee Lee Mockble, aged 21, was found guilty of murdering 26-year-old Villa fan Christopher Priest. Judge John Warner said he used his car as a weapon for the purposes of revenge. He was jailed for life and will serve a minimum of 12 years in prison. Click here
Moore, Royston Police were informed that a man had admitted the murder. This man was Stephen Hurley, he was overheard by a barmaid in an Ogmore Pub that he had killed Bev in her father’s house. Hurley was arrested for a “drugs trafficking offence” charged, appeared at magistrate court and remanded into custody at Cardiff Prison.  Hurley admitted the murder to some Prison officers and other Cardiff inmates. He was last heard saying “I’m not spending the rest if my life in jail for murder”. Following this statement of admission and intent Hurley hung himself in his cell in Cardiff prison. Click here
Murphy, Bernard Nine witness said that Michael Pollitt was threatening Brannan and Murphy with a knfe, and the Police knew it too. When that knowledge became public their conviction was overturned, but by then it was too late for Bernard Murphy. Click here
N Top
Nealon, Victor Victor Nealon was convicted of attempted rape, despite having multiple alibi witnesses, there being no forensic evidence against him and multiple witnesses giving a strong description of an attacker that looked nothing like him. After 17 years in prison he was freed when his solicitor commissioned DNA testing on the victim’s clothes. The government continues to deny him an deny him any compensation, claiming no miscarriage of justice has taken place. Click here
Nicholls, Patrick Patrick Nicholls was given a life sentence for the murder. He served 23 years, with his wife dying during that time, before the victim’s death was found to be natural causes. Click here
Nolan, Anthony Patrick There was no forensic evidence linking Nolan to the murder and he had made no admissions. The jury could not agree a verdict and he was ordered to stand trial again. Click here
Nolan, Patrick “The proof of murder depended entirely on the confession of a 19-year-old, illiterate man, made in the course of 11 hours of interviews, over three days, without a solicitor present”, said the appeal judge. Notts Police questioned 6,000 people about the crime with two other “confessions” being made. Nolan served 14 years before being freed. Click here
Nunn, Kevin Kevin Nunn was convicted of the murder of his ex-girlfriend. A sperm sample was found on her clothing, which Suffolk Police have fought to fold onto rather than release for DNA tests. The problem is, Kevin Nunn had had a vasectomy. Click here
O Top
O’Halloran, Martin “Well Martin, as you know, you are my best friend and I hope one day you can forgive me. I did this killing on my own… Every day I feel a little more sad knowing you are walking around convicted of a crime you did not do.” Click here
O’Shea, Anthony “The Court of Appeal decided to hear a two week case in two days by not hearing the evidence. As a result, the Court overlooked the key issues in the written submissions. It substituted its own version of the significant evidence. The Court’s version did not include the core evidence on which the appeal was based. Landslide was not a child pornography portal. It was an internet vehicle through which criminal webmasters processed stolen credit-card information. The evidence is clear but was overlooked by the Court.” Click here
Otoo, Joseph 17 year old Joseph Otoo always maintained that he was forced to swap shoes with a robber, but he served three years before DNA technology was used to show he was telling the truth. Click here
Osbourne, Michael A star police witness who should have been charged under joint enterprise involved in an intimate affair with an officer attached to the case, a hopelessly bungled police investigation into a murder and a failure to discipline several senior police officers make the murder of Kevin Nunes look like a story that will run for a long time yet. Click here
P Top
Parsons, Brian Brian Parsons was convicted in 1988 of the murder of Ivy Batten in Devon. The evidence against Brian was barely non-existent, and that which did exist was of very dubious provenance. Click here
Pope, Billy All through his seven years in prison Billy Pope claimed police had planted a sackful of cannabis and a shotgun on him. Now, 14 years later, he has been cleared after the appeal court heard dramatic new evidence. Click here
Power, William The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal on 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
Pun family When Baroness Scotland was found guilty of employing an illegal worker, she was fined £5000. When the Pun family were found guilty – even though they used a London law firm who run the scheme (scam?) nationwide – they were jailed for a total exceeding 14 years and had over a million pounds of money they had earned confiscated. One rule for some… Click here
Q Top
R Top
Razzell, Glyn Glyn is in prison for the murder of his estranged wife despite there being no body, no evidence of a murder and plenty of evidence that she was planning to disappear and start a new life overseas. Over ten hours of forensic examination of his car over two occasions failed to turn up an improbable and ‘highly visible’ bloodstain that was only discovered on the third examination. Click here
Reith, James The jury were told that James Reith tried to get a young acting student to re-enact an erotic scene from “Last Tango in Paris” and the raped her when she refused. But a key witness who wasn’t available for cross-examination meant that Reith did not receive a fair trial. Click here
Rooney, Thomas Another poorly directed jury caused Thomas Rooney to be put away for nine years; “The quality, character and strength of the evidence led in support of the charge was such that the jury should have entertained a reasonable doubt as to the guilt of the appellant.” Click here
S Top
Siddall, John More than 2,226 people questioned, 42 arrested and 3 convicted, on the basis of one witness’ testimony; a witness of whom staff at the care home said “she thrives on exaggerating events to their most theatrical extremes. She employs shock tactics in an attempt to convince adults that her problems are more serious than anyone else’s.” Click here
Silcott, Winston  In 1987 Winston Silcott, Mark Braithwaite and Engin Raghip were convicted of the murder in 1985 of Keith Blakelock on the riot-torn Broadwater Farm estate in Tottenham, north London, but all three were cleared in 1991 when their convictions were quashed by the Court of Appeal.Winston Silcott received £17,000 in compensation after his conviction was quashed. Forensic tests suggested evidence against him may have been fabricated by police officers. Click here
Shaw, Cornelius  Shaw served eight years after being accused of rape. Click here
Sheikh, Anver Daud Anver Daud Sheikh was twice convicted and twice acquitted of historic sexual abuse at a children’s home twenty years earlier; cases that would not even have come to court had the police bothered to check whether he was even working there at the time of the alleged crimes. Click here
Shirley, Michael The murder of Linda Cook was committed in Portsmouth on 9 December 1986. The subsequent trial led to a miscarriage of justice when Michael Shirley, an 18-year-old Royal Navy sailor, was wrongly convicted of the crime and sentenced to life imprisonment. His conviction was eventually quashed in 2003 by the Court of Appeal after the DNA profile extracted from semen samples recovered from the victim’s body was proven not to be his. Click here
Shivers, Brian In January 2012 Shivers was convicted of two soldiers’ murders. In January 2013, Shivers’s conviction was overturned by Northern Ireland’s highest appeals court. A May 2013 retrial found Shivers not guilty. He was cleared of all charges and immediately released from jail. The judge questioned why the Real IRA would choose Shivers as the gunman, with his cystic fibrosis and his engagement to a Protestant woman. Click here
Smith, Andrew The Crown alleged that Smith kicked his victim whilst he was on the floor, and that caused the death. Smith protested his innocence for 22 years before medical evidence proved that it was the impact of the fall on the victim’s head that killed him. Click here
Smith, Margaret Margaret Smith was convicted of the murder of her child on the testimony of a 7 year old, who was shown to have been in school at the time; and the flawed testimony of the disgraced Roy Meadows, whose work has been discredited. Click here
Smith, Sonny Sonny arrived at a customer’s home address to carry out the valeting of his car. While he was there, the Police arrived and carried out a drugs raid on the customer’s property. Because Sonny was at the residence he was arrested and charged with conspiracy to supply class “A” drugs along with the men involved. Click here
Steele, Anthony Anthony Steele was “mentally handicapped and at the borderline of abnormal suggestibility and compliability”, so the police helpfully wrote his confession and Steel spent 24 years in prison for signing it. On release, he returned home to the same estate and hand-delivered more than 500 letters asking people to help police find the real killer. Click here
Steenson, Dave The danger highlighted by this case is that video surveillance evidence is very convincing, because it seems to give us a neutral, direct view of events, but in practice it depends entirely on the interpretation put on it by the police who seize it and use it to clear up crimes. In other words, why we should be concerned about all the cameras watching us in public places is not for the feeble reasons put forward by groups like Liberty – that they are an intrusion on our privacy – but because what they record can be seized and, like our silence, used against us. Click here
T Top
Taft, John John Taft was accused of murdering Cynthia Bolshaw in the famous ‘Beauty in the Bath’ case. Click here
Tahery, Ali Reza Ali Reza Tahery had to take his case to the European Court of Human Rights in order to get a fair hearing. Eventually the appeal court quashed his conviction, finding that the trial judge had failed to instruct the jury adequately. Click here
Towers, Jordan A life sentence is a harsh punishment for someone who didn’t commit the crime, yet despite the evidence in court and the judge deeming that “it was clear that you Jordan did not take part in the stabbing”, a guilty verdict on a murder charge was returned. Click here
Tucker, Nicholas In November 1997 Nick Tucker, an R.A.F squadron leader with twenty-eight years service, was convicted, by a majority of ten to two, of murdering his wife.  He was sentenced to life imprisonment.  The conviction occurred because the jury did not believe Tucker’s explanation for the crash that resulted in his wife’s death. Click here
U Top
Name story Click here
V Top
Name story Click here
W Top
Walker, John The Birmingham Six were six men sentenced to life imprisonment in 1975 in England for the Birmingham pub bombings. Their convictions were declared unsafe and unsatisfactory and quashed by the Court of Appeal on 14 March 1991. New evidence of police fabrication and suppression of evidence, the successful attacks on both the confessions and the 1975 forensic evidence caused the Crown to decide not to resist their second appeal. Click here
Walker, Levi A star police witness who should have been charged under joint enterprise involved in an intimate affair with an officer attached to the case, a hopelessly bungled police investigation into a murder and a failure to discipline several senior police officers make the murder of Kevin Nunes look like a story that will run for a long time yet. Click here
Wallace, Colin “The Crown now accepted that in all probability Mr Lewis was knocked unconscious not in Mr Wallace’s home but on the river bank and that evidence at the trial of bloodstains in Mr Wallace’s car boot and of his temporary absence during a local dinner when it was claimed he might have disposed of the body were irrelevant.” An admission that came six years too late for the Colin Wallace. Click here
Ward, Judith “Our conclusion overall on the three heads of appeal is therefore that, in the failure to disclose evidence, some in the possession of the police, some in the possession of the scientists and some in the possession of the DPP, there were material irregularities at the trial; and that, having regard to that non−disclosure added to the fresh evidence we have heard, the convictions were all unsafe and unsatisfactory. We therefore allow the appeal and quash the convictions of Miss Ward on all counts.” Click here
West, Nicholas The Court of Appeal ruled that there had been significant problems with the trial Judge’s summing-up, where he failed to remind the jury about the significance of the standard of proof required. Without a direction on the standard of proof, observations made in the summing-up “could well give the jury the impression that they simply had to decide who to believe; was it more likely that the complainant was telling the truth, or the defendant?” Click here
White, Barri Barri White was convicted of the murder of his girlfriend. The team at the BBC’s Rough Justice programme weren’t so sure, and decided to do a little digging. What they found set him free. Click here
Wickens, Trevor Trevor Wickens had been locked up for 13 and a half years. The appeal hearing had already been told someone else had confessed to the killing, but that confession had not been mentioned in the 1991 trial. The judges also heard evidence from a crown pathologist which showed it was “extremely unlikely” Mr Wickens could have committed the crime was also not heard at the trial. Click here
Williams-Rigby, Basil A police trawling exercise on a care home saw 91 staff under investigation as police desperately searched for crimes to fit their suspects. Mr Williams-Rigby was charged with 22 counts of abuse as ‘victims’ switched their allegation from one member of staff to another when prosecutions failed just to claim compensation. Click here
Wilson, Sarah When her ex-boyfriend suggested a raconciliatory family holiday, Sarah Wilson made him swear on their son’s life that it was not an excuse for smuggling drugs. When he was caught with drugs hidden in his suitcase, he pleaded guilty and got eight years. Sarah, who knew nothing about the drugs, pleaded innocent and got twelve. Click here
Winzar, Dee Murder by insulin poisoning is very rare for one notable reason – the victims seldom die. The crown case was fundamentally illogical. Winzar, they’d argued, had murdered McCarthy, emphasising that she was a nurse and so knew about insulin. But if she knew about insulin, she’d have known that glucose treatment in the first six hours generally brings patients round. And who had raised the alarm? Winzar had. Click here
X Top
Y Top
Z Top
Name story Click here
%d bloggers like this: